Chemical Peel

A chemical peel is a cosmetic procedure in which a chemical solution is applied to the skin to remove the top layers of dead skin cells. The solution, typically composed of alpha-hydroxy acids, trichloroacetic acid, or phenol, causes the skin to blister and peel, revealing a new, smoother layer of skin. Chemical peels help improve the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, acne scars, uneven pigmentation, and rough texture. The procedure can be done on the face, neck, and hands. The depth of the peel can range from superficial to deep, and recovery time varies depending on the depth of the peel.

Yes Doctor’s Plastic Surgery Procedure Chemical Peel

What is a Chemical Peel?

Chemical peel is a cosmetic procedure that involves applying a chemical solution to the skin to remove the outer layer of dead skin cells. This treatment is designed to improve the appearance of fine lines, sun damage, acne scars, and other skin conditions. Chemical peels come in different strengths, and the type of peel used depends on the desired results and the individual's skin type and condition. A mild chemical peel, such as a glycolic acid peel, is designed to exfoliate the skin and promote cell renewal. It can provide a mild improvement in the texture and appearance of the skin, with minimal downtime. A moderate peel, such as trichloroacetic acid (TCA) peel, can be used to address more significant skin issues, such as acne scars, age spots, and sun damage. This type of peel requires a longer recovery time and can cause significant redness and peeling. Deep chemical peels, such as phenol peels, are used to treat severe skin issues and are performed under general anesthesia. These peels can provide dramatic results, but they are associated with a long recovery time and a higher risk of complications. It is important to choose a qualified and experienced plastic surgeon for chemical peel procedures. Risks and potential complications, such as scarring, skin discoloration, and infection, should be discussed with a plastic surgeon before the procedure. Overall, a chemical peel can provide a refreshed, younger-looking appearance with minimal downtime. But it is essential to have realistic expectations and understand the potential risks and limitations of the procedure.

What a chemical peel cannot do

  • Treat deep facial lines or wrinkles

  • Remove deep scars

  • Significantly tighten loose or sagging skin

Who is not a candidate for a chemical peel?

People with darker skin tones may be at a higher risk for side effects, such as hyperpigmentation. They should be especially cautious when considering a chemical peel. Additionally, people with certain skin conditions, such as eczema or active acne, may not be suitable candidates for a chemical peel.

Procedure steps

Superficial chemical peel

  1. Cleanse the skin: The practitioner will cleanse the skin to remove any makeup or oils that may be present.

  2. Apply the peel solution: The peel solution, which may contain alpha-hydroxy acids or glycolic acid, is applied to the skin using a cotton pad or brush.

  3. Neutralize and remove the peel: The practitioner will neutralize the peel by applying a neutralizing solution to the skin. This stops the exfoliating action of the peel and allows the practitioner to remove any remaining solution.

Medium chemical peel

The procedure steps for a medium chemical peel typically include the following:

  1. Cleanse the skin: The practitioner will cleanse the skin to remove any makeup or oils that may be present.

  2. Apply the peel solution: The peel solution, which may contain trichloroacetic acid or Jessner's solution, is applied to the skin using a cotton pad or brush. The treated area may turn whitish-grey.

  3. Neutralize the peel: The practitioner will neutralize the peel by applying a cool saline compress. It stops the exfoliating action of the peel and allows the practitioner to remove any remaining solution.

  4. Apply moisturizer and ointment: Your skin may turn red or brown days after the peel. A moisturizer is applied to the skin to hydrate and soothe the skin. The practitioner may apply an ointment to the skin to help heal.

Deep chemical peel procedure

A deep chemical peel, also known as a phenol peel, is a more invasive procedure that can correct severe sun damage and deep wrinkles. The procedure steps for a deep chemical peel typically include the following:

  1. Consultation: The patient will have a consultation with the practitioner to discuss their goals, medical history, and any potential risks or side effects associated with the procedure.

  2. Pre-treatment: The practitioner may prescribe oral or topical medications to prepare the skin for the peel and minimize potential side effects.

  3. Anesthesia: The patient will be given local or general anesthesia to minimize discomfort during the procedure.

  4. Apply the peel solution: The peel solution contains phenol and is applied to the skin using a cotton pad or brush. 

  5. Neutralize and remove the peel: The practitioner will neutralize the peel by applying a neutralizing solution to the skin. 

  6. Apply ointments and dressings: A thick coat of ointment is applied over your skin to prevent dryness and pain. The ointment must stay in place. The practitioner may also apply dressings to the skin to protect it and promote healing.

Types of Chemical Peel

  • Which Chemical Peel is Right for You?

    The type of chemical peel that is right for you will depend on your individual goals and skin concerns. There are several factors to consider before choosing the right chemical peel for you:

    1. Skin type and condition: It's essential to consider your skin type and any existing skin conditions, such as eczema or active acne, that may make you less suitable for a chemical peel.

    2. Treatment goals: It's essential to have realistic expectations about what a chemical peel can achieve and choose the peel type that will best meet your goals.

    3. Skin sensitivity: People with darker skin tones may be at a higher risk for side effects such as hyperpigmentation, so they should be especially cautious when considering a chemical peel.

    4. Cost: Chemical peels are considered elective procedures and can be expensive. It's important to consider the cost of the procedure and how it fits into your budget.

    5. Side effects: Chemical peels can cause side effects such as redness, itching, and peeling of the skin. It's important to be aware of the potential side effects before having a chemical peel and to be prepared for recovery.

  • AHA

    AHA (alpha hydroxy acid) chemical peels are a type of superficial peel that uses mild acids such as glycolic acid or lactic acid to exfoliate the top layer of the skin gently. This peel is often referred to as a "lunchtime peel/superficial peel/light peel" because it is relatively quick, easy to perform, and has minimal downtime. AHA peels can improve the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, uneven skin tone, and acne. They can also promote collagen production, improving the skin's overall appearance. It's important to note that AHA chemical peels are not recommended for people with sensitive skin or active acne. It's important to use sun protection after the procedure as the skin may be more sensitive to sun exposure.

  • BHA

    BHA (beta hydroxy acid) chemical peels are a type of superficial peel that uses salicylic acid as the main ingredient. BHA chemical peels are typically used to treat acne, blackheads, whiteheads, and blemish-prone skin. Salicylic acid helps to unclog pores, exfoliate the skin and reduce inflammation. BHA chemical peels can also improve the appearance of fine lines, uneven skin tone, and post-acne marks. BHA chemical peels are less likely to irritate than AHA peels, making them suitable for sensitive skin. They are also oil-soluble and can penetrate deep into the pores, making them more effective in treating acne. However, just like AHA peels, BHA chemical peels are not recommended for people with active acne, and it's essential to use sunscreen after the procedure as the skin may be more intolerant to sun exposure.

  • TCA

    TCA (trichloroacetic acid) chemical peels are a type of medium-depth chemical peel. They help improve the appearance of age spots, deeper wrinkles, and moderate scarring. TCA peels can penetrate deeper into the skin than AHA or BHA peels. They can effectively remove the damaged outer layers of skin. The TCA peel solution can be adjusted to different concentrations to tailor the depth of the peel to the individual's goals and concerns. TCA chemical peels can be used to treat a variety of skin conditions, such as acne, sun damage, pigmentation, and rough texture. The recovery time for a TCA peel is usually around 5-7 days, during which the skin will be red and swollen, and there may be some crusting or flaking. 

  • Phenol

    A phenol chemical peel, also known as a deep chemical peel, is a highly invasive procedure that uses phenol acid to remove the damaged outer layers of the skin. It helps correct severe sun damage and other severe skin imperfections. Phenol chemical peel can cause significant side effects such as permanent skin lightening, scarring, and burns if not done correctly. Phenol (a deep peel agent) also can pose a unique risk for people with heart diseases. Knowing the potential risks and long-term commitment required to maintain the results is important. It's essential to consult with a qualified practitioner who has experience performing phenol chemical peels. Recovery time for a phenol chemical peel is typically 2-3 weeks. However, the results are long-lasting and may last up to 10 years. 

Why Chemical Peel?

Chemical peels are a popular treatment option for people looking to improve the appearance of their skin. They can help with skin concerns such as mild to moderate fine lines, wrinkles, age spots, acne, and uneven skin tone. Chemical peels remove the damaged outer layers of the skin, stimulating the production of collagen and new skin cells. This results in a more youthful, healthy-looking appearance. In addition to their cosmetic benefits, chemical peels can also improve the skin's overall health by promoting exfoliation and unclogging pores, which can reduce the risk of acne and other skin problems. They can also be used with other skin treatments for optimal results. The most significant outcomes of the procedure are:

  • Treats Acne
  • Minimizes Pores
  • Erases Fine Lines and Wrinkles
  • Lifts Skin
  • Smooths Scarring

What Conditions Are a Chemical Peel a Solution to?

Chemical peels are a widely used cosmetic procedure that can help treat various skin conditions, including acne, fine lines, wrinkles, age spots, hyperpigmentation, sun damage, rough skin texture, and scars. Chemical peels work by applying a solution containing one or more types of acid (such as alpha hydroxy acids, beta hydroxy acids, or trichloroacetic acid) to the skin. This solution causes the outer layers of the skin to peel off, revealing the new, smoother skin underneath. The depth of the peel can be adjusted by varying the concentration of the acid solution and the length of time it is left on the skin. During the peeling process, the skin's natural healing process is stimulated, which increases collagen production, resulting in firmer and smoother-looking skin. Chemical peels offer a solution to the following condition

  • Wrinkles

    Chemical peels are an effective treatment for wrinkles by removing the damaged outer layers of the skin, revealing a smoother, more youthful-looking complexion. AHA peels, such as glycolic acid and TCA peels, can effectively treat fine lines and wrinkles.
  • Discolored skin

    Chemical peels can help improve discolored skin by removing the damaged outer layers and improving skin tone. TCA peels are particularly effective in treating age spots, hyperpigmentation, and melasma. It's also important to note that some discoloration may require a series of peels or a combination of treatments.
  • Scarring

    Chemical peels can help improve the appearance of scars by removing the damaged outer layers of the skin and stimulating collagen production. Medium-depth peels like TCA peels or deep peels like phenol peels are more effective in treating scarring. Some severe scars may require multiple peels or a combination of treatments.

Steps to getting your procedure

Research-icon

Step 1

Research

Step 2

Matching with a doctor

Step 3

Getting financing

Step 4

Booking a consultation

Why Yes Doctor for Chemical Peel

Yes Doctor is your assistant and partner in your journey for cosmetic treatments. You have questions and need qualified doctors, affordable payment options, and support from friends and other patients; Yes Doctor is there to empower you to achieve your dream.

We have built a technology platform that helps patients, doctors, and lenders collaborate and make top medical quality aesthetics procedures affordable and accessible to everyone. 

Our Buy Now, Pay Later option makes healthcare accessible through easy-to-pay installments, and interest as low as 0% makes the treatment attainable right when needed.

Frequently Asked Questions

The duration of the benefits of a chemical peel can depend on the type of peel and the condition being treated. Superficial peels, like alpha hydroxy acids (AHA) and beta hydroxy acids (BHA), typically last about 1-2 months. Medium-depth peels, like those using trichloroacetic acid (TCA), can last for about 3-4 months. The effects of deep peels, such as those using phenol, can last for several years. However, they have more prolonged recovery time and a higher risk of complications.
Chemical peels can be good for the skin as they can improve the texture and tone of the skin by removing the outermost layer of dead skin cells. They can also help reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, acne, and hyperpigmentation. However, it is important to note that chemical peels can cause side effects such as redness, irritation, and sensitivity to sunlight. It is recommended to consult with a dermatologist or esthetician before getting a chemical peel to determine whether or not it is good for your skin type and concerns
The frequency of chemical peels depends on the type of peel and the desired outcome. Light peels, such as glycolic acid peels, can be done every 1-2 months, while medium peels, such as TCA peels, are typically done every 4-6 weeks. While deep peels should be done once every few years. It's important to follow the instructions of a licensed skincare professional and not overuse chemical peels, as overuse can cause skin irritation and other side effects.
The best type of chemical peel depends on an individual's skin type, concerns, and desired outcome. Light peels, such as glycolic acid peels, are great for those with mild skin issues, such as fine lines, sun damage, and acne. Medium peels, such as TCA peels, are more effective for treating moderate wrinkles, age spots, and acne scarring. Deep peels, such as phenol peels, are the most aggressive and can be used to treat severe wrinkles, deep acne scars, and precancerous growths.